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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> a court in egypt ordered a retrial for hosni mubarak. this is how jazeera live from =doha -- doha. remembering the victims of a sunken cruise ship one year after the accident in italy. as pollution in beijing goes off of the scale, 20 million residents are being urged to stay indoors. tba -- wonach's former leader has a -- egypt's former leader has won a retrial. our reporter is live in cairo. both mubarak and the prosecutors have won an appeal for a retrial. both parties wanted this. is that unusual? >> no, it is not unusual at all. this court is known to be a meticulous establishment. it looks at the procedures of the previous court, of the prosecution, and it does throw out previous convictions on procedural grounds. this does not come as a surprise at all. this means hosni mubarak will be having a fresh, new trial in which both files -- both sides can introduce new evidence. >> what was the court's's problem but the prosecution last time? what measures will be taken to ensure they have been stronger case this time? >> the court session today was quite brief. we will be
years ago when the egyptians rose up in unity demanding an end to hosni mubarak's reign as president. today, mubarak is history, and egypt is a nation divided. m islamists hold power in the former president morsi, but some say his new constitution is just as unfair as the system and to replace. on friday, egyptians once again took to the streets. >> it was a day of protest, not a celebration. once again, tens of thousands of people gathered in cairo's tahrir square where two years ago they demonstrated against hosni mubarak. now they are demonstrating against the new president. the people want the downfall of the regime. the slogan of the arab spring is being chanted once again. this time they are telling morsi to go. >> our revolution continues. we will not allow one faction to monopolize power. we reject a muslim brotherhood state. we want a constitution that represents and protect the reprights of all egyptians. >> protesters took to the streets in many other cities as well. in alexandria, dozens were injured in clashes with the police. >> we go to cairo now. tell us how chaotic t
. >> interesting. thank you. of appeal has ordered a retrial for ho hosni mubarak and his security chief. they were accused of killing hundreds of demonstrators during the uprising. 846 protesters were killed. thousands more were injured. mubarak was sentenced to life in prison in june of last year for his role. >> these are hosni mubarak's supporters inside the courtroom celebrating with a field as a long-awaited justice. the verdict is fair. i thought well mubarak and all this assistance will be found innocent. >> there's nothing to prove that he killed the protesters. it was the fact that he did not protest -- protect them. he did not kill them. there's a difference between killing and negligence. with an employee be fired just for being careless? >> the court has thrown out convictions. a panel of judges will be looking into the case in setting the date for a new trial. mubarak and his sons will remain in jail. there are facing separate corruption charges. his 82 were on trial were previously acquited prompting anger over why the police force has been scared. they will be retried. in cairo, tho
. while egyptians are raising their voices two years after rising up against hosni mubarak, in syria, the defiance has not shifted president assad. homs has seen some of the worst fighting. our reporter has returned for this special report. >> some of the heaviest fighting happened here. this neighborhood came to symbolize a brutal conflict. a ferocious government offensive after the opposition, it was an assault on an entire community. after nearly one year, life is slowly returning. rubbish collectors are on the job. a small sign the government is back on the street. some families are starting to come home. how is life here, i asked. could not be better, he replied. he gives an anxious look at the soldiers escorting us. a repair shop is back in business. it is not much of a bicycle, but he makes it work. it is what life is like here. >> services are very good. before, life was more difficult. things are getting better day by day. >> it is still a fragile calm, but good enough for children to play on the street. even they do not take notice when guns go off in the distance. it is pa
in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to do that. >> thank you very much. while
the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to
critics saying hosni mubarak is stepping down. >> egypt will never be the same. >> two years ago today, thousands of egyptians fill tahrir square, sparking a revolution that brought down dictator hosni mubarak. we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous from cairo, a protest march interfere and speak with egyptian filmmaker jehane noujaim. it was four years ago this month when oscar grant, the 22-year old bay area resident, was shot to death by a bart police officer on new year's day in 2009. a new dramatic film portrays the last day of oscar's life. >> to you have plans for the night? >> nothing major. head out to the city. train don't you take the out there? that way you guys can drink and hang out and not have to worry about anything. >> getting over there and getting back? >> no traffic, either. you know it is going to be crazy going and coming back. >> we might take it. >> we will speak with first-time filmmaker, 26-year-old ryan coogler who worked as a social worker to juvenile detention center in san francisco. then, "who is dayani cristal?" >> a new film featuring the mexican act
intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian president, hosni mubarak. tanks and armored vehicles, and snipers all over the place. hundreds of egyptian protesters killed. and then it was over. the arab spring had come to egypt. those were days of high optimism. i was in egypt with secretary of state hillary clinton a few weeks after the revolution. we walked around tahrir square with little security. egyptians were thrilled to see her. i remember the near euphoria when she went to the nearby u.s. ambassador to thank the american diplomats for all their hard work during those difficult days. >> madam secretary, what do you think about tahrir square? >> well, it was very exciting and moving for me to go to tahrir square and have some sense of what those amazing days must have been like here in cairo. and i am so looking forward to helping in any way that we can, in this transformation, and all the work that needs to be done. >> reporter: that was then, this is egypt now, huge concrete blocks surround all the entrances to the u.s. embassy. that reads free egypt, free palesti
. that was cairo two years ago. hosni mubarak was in power. in 18 days he would step down. the country has seen very few calm days since. egypt's first ever free election put a president in office who has still not closed the gap between the government and a frustrated local and vocal opposition. the population who want even more change. i want to bring in reza sayah in cairo. take us to the scene in cairo there behind you. i understand that protesters have gathered. there are some police officers that are hurt. this is just in cairo alone. >> reporter: yes, suzanne. there have been clashes here. we don't want to blow things out of proportion. here in cairo the violence has been limited to about two streets. behind us there's a street that leads to the interior ministry and other government buildings. police erected a large barrier. what you have is on one side protesters teenagers throwing rocks and debris over the barrier at police. police responding by firing tear gas. sometimes police themselves throwing rocks at the protesters, which is probably not a strategy you'll find in a police train
, and people have been killed to mark the second anniversary of the overthrow of hosni mubarak. perce this report from cairo. >> the death sentences were greeted with elation. that is what they wanted. the opposite reaction in were defendants are being held. those sentenced to death our followers are the local club appeared their fellow supporters took to the st. in in europe. attempt to storm the prison were in force in clouds of tear gas and gunfire. protesters and police were killed and dozens of others wounded. bac in cairo, it the fans of al- ahly gathered jubilantly in the stadium. some continue to insist the killings had a political dimension. >> we were among the first to support the revolution. we fought against mubarak and then against others. this was an act of retaliation by ministry forces because of this. amid the celebration one fundamental remains on answered. was there a conspiracy? to what degree can accountability be attached to the body in power at the time of the killings, the supreme consulates of armed forces. >> the reasons for the judgment, the remaining 52 de
. >> that was the uprising commonly known as the arab spring that led to the ouster of hosni mubarak, the two-year anniversary of protests in cairo, egypt. a live look there at the square. >>> okay. it is a friday. so that means the weekend is here. and most important guy here today would be lawrence karnow. >> thank you very much. [ laughter ] >> i am feeling much better now. it's going to be an interesting weekend. could see some showers but i think the big story will be the cold temperatures. it's going to be chilly as we head into the weekend and the cold storm plunges into the bay area. it looks like leftover showers outside our hi-def doppler picking up on that not a whole lot but you can see a couple of pop-up showers now in toward the livermore valley a few light showers. so if you are stepping outside, don't be surprised if you need the windshield wiper ever so briefly this morning. we have a couple systems. one is going to push in later bringing with it cold air for the weekend. right now those temperatures in the 40s and 50s, much chillier t
dictator who hosni mubarak. many demand the revolution continue. they say it has been thwarted by the islamists and that's why they're taking back to the streets. the clashes have been intense. seven people have been killed. more than 250 injured in clashes across the country. the police using that tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the protesters at bay. they have been firing back with petrol bombs and stones. it's a very intense and volatile situation marking this second anniversary of the revolution. brian? >> a yman mohyeldin after a rough night in cairo. thanks. >>> back in this country in washington today, thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators marched to the steps of the supreme court, protesting the landmark decision that legalized abortion. annual march for life as it's called, this year coincides with the 40th anniversary of the roe vs. wade decision. >>> a federal appeals court has dealt president obama a big legal setback tonight and given republicans who charged that he acted improperly when he made some job appointments a huge victory. this is about what
against the regime of president hosni mubarak. >> cairo on saturday morning. after a long night of violent demonstrations and not just in the capital. troops clashed with anti- government protesters after they stormed the offices of the muslim brotherhood. eight deaths were reported their late friday. in tahrir square, thousands rally to mark the second anniversary of the revolution. they object to the new constitution and its reliance on islamic law and the desperate state of the economy. officials decry the protesters of counterrevolutionaries and supporters of the old mubarak regime. but protesters insist it is not about the past -- it is about the future. memo we only have one demand -- the regime should go because they have done nothing for us. >> secularist and liberals say the government has betrayed the revolution. >> for the latest, let's go now to our correspondent in cairo. what is the latest you can tell us from where you are? >> i was this morning at the court where there was celebration by the relatives of the people who died after 21 people were sentenced to death, mainly fa
the scenes back then. this was a country united behind one goal, to topple the dictator hosni mubarak but two years on this country is divided, polarized and for the first time many people here fear the violence is actually threatening the country's very stability. the chaotic moments when anger turned deadly in port saeed. outside the city's jail, dozens were killed as protesters tried to storm it to free prisoners who minutes earlier were sentenced to death in cairo. 21 defendants were convicted for their part in a soccer stadium massacre that killed more than 70 fans one year ago. the verdict was read and relatives of those killed last year showed grief and joy. for them the ruling was just. an investigation concluded last year's deadly rampage was not a spontaneous outburst of crowd violence. many believed it was a conspiracy to kill supporters of a popular soccer team whose fans have been at the forefront of egypt's revolution. a revolution that marked its second anniversary yesterday with deadly clashes in cairo and other cities, a scene quite different than two years ago. under pressur
powerful leaders like egypt's hosni mubarak and libya's moammar gadhafi, and unleashing a flood of illegal weapons. >> when gadhafi was falling, i was there at the time, i had never seen so many weapons in my entire life. and they were just being taken from depots, they were being handed over to militant groups. and then they went all over the region. they went from country to country, and they fell into the hands of militant groups. and this is no longer theoretical. seven americans have been killed, including a u.s. master, just in the last four months. >> call it the downside of the arab spring. revolutions that the u.s. are actively, tacitly supported in places like libya and egypt have left shaking governments in place and more instability to an already volatile region. delaware democratic senator chris coons shares the senate foreign relations subcommittee on africa and he joins me now. senator coons, thank you so much for being on the program. >> thank you, luke. >> i want to ask you, we were very much supportive here in the united states two years ago, on the two-year anniversary o
of president hosni mubarak. jeffrey brown has our story. >> brown: political violence ravaged egypt for a fifth day after a weekend that saw more than 50 people killed. in cairo, protestors threw rocks and gasoline bombs at riot police. police in turn fired tear gas into the crowds who oppose president mohammed morsi and his islamist dominated government. >> what's happening here in the country is really shameful. destroying the city is not fair. but at the same time the way the police treat people makes tensions heavier because all decisions by morsi's government have been taken out of the public interest. >> brown: security officials said a man described as a by-stander was killed by a gunshot. it was unclear who fired it. and government tanks were on the streets in the cities of suez and port said. they enforced a curfew that an angry president morsi announced last night. >> to end the bloodshed, to maintain security against vandals and law breakers and for the protection of citizens, i have decided after referring to the constitution to announce the imposing of the state of emergency in por
in a violent start to the second anniversary of the uprigss that tloed ouster of hosni mubarak. the protesters are unhappy with the progress that's been made since the revolution. and this shines a light on the ongoing divide between islamists and their secular opponents. >>> a new threat from north korea. pyongyang threatened to attack south korea if seoul joins in a new round of united nations sanctions. north korea calls the sanctions, quote, a declaration of war. >>> and as if the flu season wasn't enough to worry about, a new strain of the norovirus stomach bug is sweeping through the u.s. and it's nasty with gut-wrenching effects that experts say can be even harder to fight off than the flu. it's also easily spread through touching a contaminated surface or eating food handled by an infected person. >>> sports for disabled students is the focus of a sweeping now policy. the department of education is ordering schools to include disabled students in existing sports programs or create equal alternative options. >>> we're hearing now from the fake girlfriend in the manti te'o hoax. these ar
to the overthrow of mu bar bar hosni mubarak. how much has changed there? we have a reporter live in cairo. can we go back to the live pictures and explain exactly what's going on there? >> reporter: there are clashes taking place. we don't want to blow things out of proportion. this is a street a few blocks away from the square that leads to government buildings. police recollected a concrete barrier on one side. you have young protesters. they look like teenagers throwing rocks over the babarri police. a few blocks from that street, things are very calm. not a lot of people out here. a few hundred. we expect the larger crowds to come after friday prayers which end about an hour and a half from now. it's hard to believe it was two years ago when egyptians started an uprising that toppled former president hosni mubarak, of course that uprising started here in tahrir square. they said enough with hosni mubarak. we want our political freedom. we want jobs, a better way of life. i don't think a lot of people expected hosni mubarak to be toppled. incredibly, he was. however, two years later, not all e
that toppled hosni mubarak. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. what is happening there now? this has been going on all day. what is happening now? >> it is 9:00 p.m. local time, victor, and here in tahrir square we're starting to see some of the protesters leave. there are still several thousand people here, but things relatively calm at this location. however, in other parts of cairo, in other parts of egypt, things seem to be escalating, we're seeing violence in pockets of clashes in the side streets, few blocks away from tahrir square. we're seeing clashes between protesters and police in front of the state tv building here in cairo, several blocks away. we're also seeing clashes, we can also tell you that protesters have blocked off traffic in both directions. the 6th of october bridge, a major bridge over the river. they also blocked off a subway system here near in tahrir square. hard to believe it was two years ago, but an uprising here in egypt eventually toppled then president hosni mubarak, and it started right here in tahrir square this iconic landmark, people gathered and demanded a
on the egyptians during the three tect rule. former strong man hosni mubarak. >> to end the bloodshed, to have security against vandals. and for the perception of citizens, i have decided after referring to the constitution to announce imposing of the state of emergency. >> stagnant economy in a divided political environment, egyptians are frustrated with the slow pace of reforms. increasing theyly complain morsi and the ruling muslim brotherhood party halftimeed thhijackedrevolution and are img islamic dictatorship. >> morsi called on the opposition to engage in national dialogue. the offer was quickly rejected leave nothing clear route to ending the turmoil. bret? >> bret: connor, thank you. police in brazil made three arrests and reportedly detained a fourth person in connection with sunday morning nightclub fire. police say a banned pyrotechnic show started the fire. it's believe two members of the band and two of the club's owners are in custody. the white house is condemning what it calls iran violation of the universal freedom of religion. american pastor saeed abadini was reportedly co
president hosni mubarak won a retrial during the 2011 revolution. responsible for the murders by government security forces. both were sentenced to life in prison. the retrial based on the same evidence, but this time judges will be allowed to consider mubarak's health. he recently broke his ribs in a fall. his trial drew the world's attention because he was the first arab leader to be jailed by his own people and he appeared in court lying on a hospital bed confined to a cage. i'm joined now by cairo by sarah. early afternoon where you are. what is the reaction there? >> so far, a lot of uncertainty about how there will be no evidence submitted to the court. mubarak that there is new evidence that could be accepted by the court. but everyone is wondering about the fact, the fact-finding commission mohammed horsy and whether the evidence accepted by the court or not. >> do we have any idea how quickly this retrial might happen? >> the lawyer estimates it should take place within two months, not before that. >> egypt certainly has struggled to move to democracy. most recently the controversy
four rounds of violence have not been held to account. >> hosni mubarak's fate has always been a heated topic. the violence outside the court room during the proceedings. a time when the country is struggling to fix its economy. al jazeera, cairo. minister hasance escaped onunharmed after a bomb exploded near his car. it is not clear if he was the target. two of his guards were injured. he made headlines when members of his security team were arrested on terrorism charges. security officials in libya city still have no information about who attacked a italian diplomat in benghazi. the car came under fire on saturday. several bullets hit the car window but the consul was not injured. it is where the attack on the u.s. consulate took place last year, which resulted in the death of the ambassador and three of his employees. explosions in several afghan villages -- trying to recover the bodies of four taliban fighters killed in a battle with nato troops, but they may have been wearing suicide bests -- that has not been concerned -- confirmed. the parliament of has been removed for
powell tells us things got rough. >> with the years after mass protest brought down hosni mubarak, egypt remains as volatile as ever. thousands turned out across the country. antigovernment rallies. dozens were injured in alexandria, suez and cairo. police responded with tear gas and rubber bullets in scenes that are too frequent in the past two years. eegypt is deeply divided with many believing that newly elected mohammed morsi halftimeed the revolution. >> i would like to morsi to drop the brotherhood. become president for all egyptians. egyptians can get rid of you like with the previous leader. >> opposition groups accuse him of being autocratic. they have a national election, but they complain it's anti-democratic. >> we want democratic constitution. aside from organizing protest, they have been ineffective to challenge morsi and the muslim brotherhood at ballot box. they lack a leader let alone a policy to turn egypt around. egyptians will elect a new partparliament this spring. they are trying to use the anger to propel the opposition forward. if they can it would mean a signific
anniversary of the uprising that led to the outster of hosni mubarak. now they say that morsi is just one dictator replacing another. >>> and north korea turning its anger toward the south. they warn of what they call physical countermeasures against south korea if they directly participate in u.n. sanctions against the north. they say the u.n. resolution passed earlier this week is equivalent to a declaration of war. >>> we told you about the plan to allow women to combat positions in the military. leon panetta made it official. panetta sang the praises of women who are served, are serving, or paid the ultimate price. up in the next half hour. we'll speak with sfwlnzoe bedele of four women who filed a lawsuit challenging the pentagon policy, and kingsley browne, who wrote "coed combat," a book against women in combat. >>> frightening video. a 1-year-old girl ejected from a car during an icy crash in russia the child laying on the road and a huge semi truck barely misses her. here it is in slow motion. wow. the driver lost control of the suv while trying to pass another car. the child not
hosni mubarak was forced from power and now people seem to, some of them anyway, want to see another overthrow happen on the streets of egypt. conor powell is following all of these developments for us. good morning, conor. >> reporter: well, martha, it has been six days of growing protests and violent riots. now the anger on the street really stems from the slow pace of political and economic reform. on sunday night the current president, mohammed morsi, declared martial law in three cities, including suez, the major shipping hub. he defended the emergency law calling it necessarily but it is eerily similar to the ones imposed on egyptians for the three decade long rule of angelo mozilo, -- hosni mubarak, former strong man. they were taking to the streets protesting against the moresy government. egyptians say morsi is becoming another hosni mubarak with islamic face. martha, morsi offered a hand to the opposition to engage in dialogue. that offer was quickly rejected. martha: how is the military responding to all of this, conor? >> reporter: the top general, top military commander
. >> the second anniversary of the revolution that ousted hosni mubarak. they say morrissey has betrayed the revolution, and dozens were injured. some hospitalized. nbc's amman joins me from cairo. let's talk about the protests, pro and conmorsi today. what is the overall feeling about president morsi two years in? >> if we had to measure it by the show of force or the protesters that are out today, you would say that on the second anniversary, his popularity among those on the streets, is very low. in fact, you know, andrea, we're standing several hundred feet among one of the streets near the division building here, and the tear gas that is being used is so strong we can feel it here in our office. these clashes have been by protesters who say that president morsi and the muslim brotherhood are taking over egypt and betraying the aspirations of a revolution they foot for two years ago. now, no doubt, president morsi and the muslim brotherhood enjoy support and popularity. they are not on the streets today. that is because the muslim brotherhood has ordered their supporters and their fo
helped topple president hosni mubarak. street battles with police broke out in cairo and elsewhere, and well more than 300 people were hurt. the protesters say the revolution was hijacked by islamists, who now control the government. thousands of anti-abortion protesters rallied in washington today against "roe versus wade." the supreme court decision that legalized abortion was handed down 40 years ago this week. this year's rally and march came in frigid temperatures. protesters carried signs and chanted slogans on the steps of the supreme court. abortion rights demonstrators staged a counter-demonstration there. republican senator saxby chambliss of georgia will not run for a third term in 2014. in a statement today, chambliss said, "this is about frustration." he said he's unhappy with president obama's direction and tired of partisan gridlock. chambliss had angered tea party forces when he supported tax increases as part of a plan to tame the federal deficit. wall street closed the week with another rally. the dow jones industrial average gained 70 points to close near 13,896.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)